Robert Ivy and his Fight for Public Health

     Robert Ivy was born in Columbus, Missouri and has since went on to attend Tulane University and the University of the South. During his time in school, he acquired the knowledge necessary to become a master architect.

Since graduating, Robert Ivy has worked with Architectural Record, McGraw-Hill, and the American Institute of Architects, where he has earned dozens of awards for him and his organizations. Until 1996, when he joined McGraw-Hill, he was a principle at Dean and Dean.

Currently Robert Ivy holds the positions of Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer at the American Institute of Architects.

Robert Ivy received the Crane Award in 2009 from American Business Media. He has contributed to the earning of 26 Jesse H. Neal Awards and 7 Ozzies, in 1998 McGraw-Hill awarded him for his management skills in 1998. In 2010 Alpha Rho Chi recognized Robert Ivy with the official title of Master Architect.

In recent years, Ivy has been using his knowledge in architecture to create a healthier environment for people. Robert Ivy says that simple changes to design like providing more windows could increase productivity, which in turn gets people up and moving and improves physical health. In an article he authored for HuffingtonPost, he talked about how architects and public health officials have began working together to create buildings that use design choices to encourage healthier living.

The Projects

The Seattle Children Hospital’s Building Hope section is an expansion designed by ZGF Associates. The building was designed using a concept called biophilia. Biophilia is a conceptual hypothesis that says humans have an urge to interact and connect with different forms of life. The building uses images and patterns similar to those found in nature to provide the children with a space that feels safe and nurturing.

Architects are currently working together in Charlottesville, Virginia to study how design affects childhood obesity. The team is attempting to use this research to encourage healthy eating choices and increase physical activity via the design choices implemented in educational buildings.

Convincing people that architectural design can have a positive impact on human health has been a tough road to travel for Robert Ivy. In the future, Ivy says he would like to see real research and data to provide the public with evidence of what he and many architects already know.

You may also check https://www.kcrw.com/people/robert-ivy.