What It Takes to Be a Litigator Like Philadelphia’s Karl Heideck

     The worst guide to a career in law is television. Boston Legal created a sense of glamor around a fraternity setting that begged for lawsuits against the heroes Denny Crane and Alan Shore. Law & Order teaches that every major prosecution can be handled in just 42 minutes. And many others do little justice to the profession, either.

In this article, we will discuss just how one becomes a litigator, and then profile one of the brightest minds in the field.

 

How to Become a Litigator

Step 1 is to get a bachelor’s degree. Unlike the medical field, one does not have to have a strong pre-law background. A degree in history, accounting, or communications will suffice.

Step 2 is to take the LSAT. Most graduate schools require students to take the GMAT, and medical school hopefuls take the MCAT. For law school, it’s the LSAT.

Step 3 is to complete law school.

Step 4 is to pass your state’s bar exam.

Following these qualifications, a person can go to court on behalf of someone else in the state in which he is qualified to practice. However, experience goes a long way, and without it, better lawyers will win even with a weak case.

 

Karl Heideck

Among the top 40 lawyers under 40 in the Philadelphia area, Karl Heideck stands out more than most. This Temple University graduate has spent the better part of a decade excelling in the area of conflict resolution while fighting to protect the rights of others.

Karl Heideck is most notably known for his protection of the civil liberties of author and Iraq War veteran, Christopher Pascale, whose book War Poems: A Marine’s Tour 2003-2008 was under threat of being banned. Mr. Heideck, knowing that the best litigation happens outside the courtroom, took the responsible groups to task and as of November, 2016, the book was permitted a full release.

To say the least, Karl Heideck is an American hero who worked to fight for the rights of someone who served our country with honor.

Law careers are not like we see on TV, but there is a need for good, skilled attorneys. For those who have what it takes, important work is waiting to be done. For those who are thinking of going into law, just think of Karl Heideck, and use his examples (there are many) as your guide.

See https://angel.co/karl-heideck.

July 4, 2017

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